In this section:

Pain: The Messenger

 

Back & Neck Anatomy

Causes of Back Pain


How to Treat

 

Heat/Ice Therapy

 

Inversion

 

Joint Dysfunction

 

Postural Education


















Pain: The Messenger


Muscle Injury affects every person in our society but it is often dismissed as “growing pain”, “just a little sore” or “I don’t know why it hurts, it will probably just go away”. Often we are quick to take pain-killers and anti-inflammatory drugs to reduce our muscle pain.

 

Taking a closer look at how muscles function may give you more options for staying pain free in your day-to-day life.

Why Does It Hurt?


Muscle injury and post injury can be very pain sensitive
for two main reasons:

 

Tissue Damage and Spasm

 

Tissue damage causes pain because there has been muscle, tendon or ligament contusion, strain, sprain or tearing. Pain is then maintained by the body’s own healing action of “protective spasm”.

 

Protective spasm occurs when tissue damage of some kind occurs, even overuse or irritation. The result is an increase of tension on all parts of the muscle including fascia and tendon and the nerves. This intrinsic pressure stimulates the nerves, causing them to fire at the slightest use or external pressure from your therapist. Muscle pain is often accompanied by strange referring nerve sensations called Trigger Point referral. Trigger point pain can be very specific or diffuse and will occur in all soft tissues of the body.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Types of Massage | Muscle Injury | Sports Massage & Personal Training | Home Care | Home

Lisa Christine Alexander, Registered Massage Therapist | Call or Text: 604-886-8880

 

 

 

 

Lisa Christine Alexander

Registered Massage Therapist
Call or Text:
604-886-8880








 











 


In this section:

Pain: The Messenger

 

Back & Neck Anatomy

Causes of Back Pain


How to Treat

 

Heat/Ice Therapy

 

Inversion

 

Joint Dysfunction

 

Postural Education


Anatomy of the Back and Neck


The Spinal Column is made up of 7 Cervial, 12 Thoracic, and 5 Lumbar vertebrae which are stacked one on top of each other. Each vertebra, except the first and second neck vertebrae, are separated by a disc. The discs are cartilaginous pads which hold a space between each of the vertebrae.

 

The spine is divided into four sections:


Cervical (neck)
Thoracic (mid back)
Lumbar (low back)
Sacrum/coccyx (pelvic region)



 


The natural curves distribute the body weight properly on the vertebrae approximately 80% on the front (body) of the vertebra and 20% on the back (facette joints) of the vertebra.


When looking at the spine from the side there are four natural curves in the spine. These curves are extremely important in keeping a healthy and pain free back. The cervical and lumbar curves are forward, towards your face, for reference.

 

The cervical curve develops when as a baby we begin to raise our head. The lumbar curve develops when we first begin to stand and walk. The thoracic and sacrum/coccyx curves backwards, towards the back of your head, and we are born with these curves. The sacrum/coccyx vertebrae are all fused together so we do not generally worry about that curve as much. However, the wrong sacro-coccygeal angle will impair proper function of the S.I. joint.

 

We generally speak about the three natural curves of the spine. The natural curves of the spine are extremely important to the function and health of our spine and ultimately our entire body. The curves act as shock absorbers for our spine. The curves also position the joints of the spine at the proper angle to ensure full and normal motion.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Types of Massage | Muscle Injury | Sports Massage & Personal Training | Home Care | Home

Lisa Christine Alexander, Registered Massage Therapist | Call or Text: 604-886-8880






 
 











 


In this section:

Pain: The Messenger

 

Back & Neck Anatomy

Causes of Back Pain


How to Treat

 

Heat/Ice Therapy

 

Inversion

 

Joint Dysfunction

 

Postural Education






















Common Causes of Back Pain

Back pain can be very mysterious. You can go to five different health care providers and get five different opinions. It can get very frustrating. Don't worry; almost everyone can get some relief from this life changing problem.

 

 

 

 

Muscle strain or spasm


Usually caused by poor posture and improper lifting techniques. Maintaining the three natural curves of your spine at all times will greatly decrease the chances of this type of back pain. Pain from muscular strain can get intense especially with movement. This pain generally does not travel down the legs past the knee.

 

Back sprain


This condition is caused by an excessive stretching of the ligaments, discs and facet joints and is usually characterized by inflammation and acute pain. This condition is frequently caused by athletic injury, auto accidents, improper lifting, etc.

 

Postural back pain


This is usually caused by a poor posture that puts tension on the supporting muscles and ligaments of the spine. Returning to a proper posture that maintains the natural curves of the spine should greatly decrease the symptoms of this problem. Watch out for repeated postural strains from daily habits such as poorly designed work stations, propping up pillows under your neck, slouched seating postures and cradling the phone with your shoulder to name just a few. Repeated us of poor posture can lead to chronic pain and more serious back problems.

 

Degenerative Diseases of the Spine


Degenerative Diseases of the Spine and peripheral joints include Osteo-Arthritis, Osteoporosis, Degenerative Disc disease etc. All of these conditions include an inflammatory phase and usually occur at sites in the spine that are under postural duress. Although some of these conditions are genetic some of the time, most of them may be improved with posture and diet.

 

 


Facet Joint Irritation


The Facet Joints are the articulations or connections between the vertebrae in the spine and are quite beveled and sharp. They are like any other joint in the body that enable the bending or twisting movements of the spine. The facet joints can get inflamed secondary to injury or arthritis and cause pain and stiffness. When the facet joints are affected in the neck or cervical spine it typically causes pain in this area as well headaches and difficulty rotating the head.


People who suffer from this problem usually complain that they have to turn their entire body to look over to the right or left. Pain can be felt in other areas such as the shoulders or mid back area. Low back pain is commonly caused by Facet Joint Syndrome. Pain is felt in the lower back and sometimes it can be felt in the buttock as well in the thighs usually not going below the knee. Inflammation of these joints can cause stiffness and difficulty standing up straight and getting up out of a chair.

 

Disc Herniation (frequently referred to as slipped disc)


Disc problems are common. Derangement's to the normal curves of the spine causes uneven pressure on our spinal discs. This uneven pressure will produce uneven stress on the disc, which will cause it to break down. This is much like your car when the front end is out of alignment and your tires wear unevenly.


This uneven pressure can cause the center of the disc to bulge on one side or the other. This frequently causes irritation and pressure on the spinal nerves or spinal cord. This can cause pain, numbness, tingling and weakness in the arms and legs (frequently called sciatica). A disc herniation can also be caused by a traumatic injury such as a fall.

 

 

Disc prolapse


A prolapsed disc is much like a herniation but in a prolapsed disc a part of the center portion of the disc (nucleus propulsis), actually exits the disc. This condition can be very serious because it frequently puts a great deal of pressure on the spinal cord, spinal nerves or both.

 

NOTE: Always remember that back pain can be caused by a serious illness such as cancer or infection, so an examination by your doctor is always recommended for recurring or stubborn back pain.

Propulsus and DDD images courtesy of www.chirogeek.com

 

Types of Massage | Muscle Injury | Sports Massage & Personal Training | Home Care | Home

Lisa Christine Alexander, Registered Massage Therapist | Call or Text: 604-886-8880













Lower Back Pain Study

 

A new study by a researcher at University of Toronto shows that massage therapy can cure 63% of patients with sub-acute low-back pain.

 

Click here to read article



























PROPULSUS


click image for large view

 











 


In this section:

Pain: The Messenger

 

Back & Neck Anatomy

Causes of Back Pain


How to Treat

 

Heat/Ice Therapy

 

Inversion

 

Joint Dysfunction

 

Postural Education


How to Treat Muscle Injuries

 

Muscle injury occurring from sport activities, accidents or overuse can cause significant joint imbalance. Due to the tendency of muscle tissue to spasm, improper joint tracking and misalignment are common symptoms of injuries to whole muscle groups.. Simple muscle spasm from strain/sprain or tear injuries may result in a pain cycle that inhibits proper use and function due to pain and inflammation.

 

When you have an injury check for these signs:

 

Swelling or bruising
Redness & heat
Local pain

 

If you have any of these signs, the best thing you can do is

put your cold pack on that area and think about R.I.C.E.

 

REST. Stopping the source of irritation always helps
ICE constricts blood vessels, cools heat & dispels swelling
COMPRESSION diminishes swelling by mechanical force.
ELEVATION diminishes swelling through gravitational force.

 

ICE


The application of ice is a most important element in the treatment of acute muscle injury.
It usually takes an elastic tensor bandage to keep an ice pack on while you go about your day. For best results you should ice 3 times a day for 7 minutes, more if you are working. Try not to move the joint that has pain and possibly tendonitis in a way that causes pain.


TENDONITIS


The pain you have in your joints may be related to tendon pain associated with tendonitis.
Tendonitis is very common and precedes more complicated conditions like Thoracic Outlet Syndrome, Carpal Tunnel Syndrome and Adhesive Capsulitis etc. If you have pain in any of the circled areas when you move the associated joint, think tendonitis before arthritis. Treating tendonitis with stretching, ice or hot and cold packs and massage therapy, can prevent the formation of stubborn Trigger Points or Myofascial Adhesions.

 

TRIGGER POINTS

In reaction to injury or overuse muscles build areas of spasm to protect the injured fibers. Tissues which develope Trigger Points include muscle, tendon, ligament of fascia and may present with diffuse ache or sharp local pain depending on what type of enervation that tissue receives. Light to deep sustained pressure is used to release the restricted tissues, allowing the return proper circulation and nerve function.

 

 

 


Types of Massage | Muscle Injury | Sports Massage & Personal Training | Home Care | Home

Lisa Christine Alexander, Registered Massage Therapist | Call or Text: 604-886-8880

 
















A survey of 2000 BC Massage Therapy patients shows:

 

95% think the treatments improved their conditions


77% think massage therapy is highly effective


49% said massage therapy made it possible for them to reduce or stop drug or medical treatment

 

 











 


In this section:

Pain: The Messenger

 

Back & Neck Anatomy

Causes of Back Pain


How to Treat

 

Heat/Ice Therapy

 

Inversion

 

Joint Dysfunction

 

Postural Education


The therapeutic use of hot and cold has been explored by almost every culture in the world. In modern therapeutic applications, therapists use ice to affect the body in many different ways depending on desired outcome.


I have included a definition of Thermotherapy and Cryotherapy, Hot Stone Therapy and a very helpful table of reflex effects of hot and cold. This article appeared in the Massage Therapist Association Journal in the late 80’s. If you have any idea who the author is, please contact me.

 

Cryotherapy: The therpeutic use of Ice


Ice can be used to reduce swelling, increase circulation, decrease circulation, and help re-model adhered tissue after the application of friction massage or deep PNF stretching and deep tissue massage. If you have pain or soreness to the touch after deep tissue massage, apply ice to the area for 7-10 minutes and repeat 3 times daily or as necessary. Stretch the part at least once after area has warmed to the touch if treating overuse type injuries, such as tendonitis.

 

 

Cryotherapy (Cold Therapy) is the local or general use of low temperatures in medical therapy or the removal of heat from a body part. Its goal is to decrease cellular metabolism, increase cellular survival, decrease inflammation, decrease pain and spasm, and to promote vasoconstriction.


Thermotherapy (Heat Therapy) is the application of heat to the body for pain relief and health. It can take the form of a hot cloth, hot water, ultrasound, heating pad, hydrocollator packs, whirlpool baths, and many others. It can be beneficial to those with arthritis and stiff muscles and injuries to the deep tissue of the skin. Heat may be an effective self-care treatment for conditions like rheumatoid arthritis.

 

Heat therapy is most commonly used for rehabilitation purposes. The therapeutic effects of heat include increasing the extensibility of collagen tissues; decreasing joint stiffness; reducing pain; relieving muscle spasms; reducing inflammation, edema, and aids in the postacute phase of healing; and increasing blood flow. The increased blood flow to the affected area provides proteins, nutrients, and oxygen for better healing.


Source: wikipedia.org

 

 

 

 

Types of Massage | Muscle Injury | Sports Massage & Personal Training | Home Care | Home

Lisa Christine Alexander, Registered Massage Therapist | Call or Text: 604-886-8880
















Reflex Effects of Prolonged Heat

 

Click here to view



 











 


In this section:

Pain: The Messenger

 

Back & Neck Anatomy

Causes of Back Pain


How to Treat

 

Heat/Ice Therapy

 

Inversion

 

Joint Dysfunction

 

Postural Education


Inversion


Inversion enhances the flow of cerebral spinal fluid throughout the entire spinal column, enhancing nerve and spinal function. A state of natural traction occurs; stretching tendons, ligament and muscle, allowing the spine to find natural alignment and balance.

 

In figure 1, you will notice that the person is simply supporting the hips and allowing the spine to hand from the sacrum. The patient is in complete control of the experience. A sensation of dizzyness is normal and will diminish with repeated use. This is a great therapy for people with mild to moderate subluxation.

 



Benefits of Inversion


Doctors, physical therapists and sports trainers recognize inversion as a safe and effective form of therapy for the spine and weight-bearing joints. In fact, the US Army is writing Inversion into its worldwide physical training manual that will be adopted for the new millennium.


Inversion elongates the spine, increasing the space between the vertebrae, which relieves the pressure on discs, ligaments and nerve roots. Less pressure means less back pain.


Inverting yourself to as little as 25° for even a few minutes can help relax tense muscles and speed the flow of lymphatic fluids which flush out the body's wastes and carry them to the blood stream. The faster this waste is cleared, and fresh supplies of oxygen are introduced, the faster stiffness and pain in the muscles can disappear. A study conducted by physiotherapist L.J. Nosse found that, "EMG (electromyographic) activity, an indicator of muscle pain, declined over 35% within ten seconds of assuming the inverted position".


Inversion Helps Improve Circulation and Accelerates the Cleansing of Blood and Lymph Fluids. The cardiovascular system is made up of the heart, veins, arteries, and capillaries. It is your body's transportation system, carrying food and oxygen to your body's cells. Your heart pumps blood through the system: oxygen-rich blood from the lungs goes out through the arteries and waste-filled blood comes back through the veins to be cleansed and recharged with oxygen. The cardiovascular system also retrieves blood from your legs and lower torso, carrying it upwards against the force of gravity. Inversion allows your body to work with gravity to ease the circulation process.

 

Unlike the cardiovascular system, the lymphatic system has no pump. Only the alternate contraction and relaxation of muscles moves lymphatic fluid "uphill" through capillaries and one-way valves to the upper chest for cleansing. Inverting the body so that gravity works with, not against, these one-way valves helps to push the lactic fluid up to the chest. The faster the lymphatic system is cleared the faster the ache and pain of stiff muscles disappears.

 

Inversion Helps Increase Oxygen Flow to the Brain. Your heart must work against gravity to pump blood up to your brain, which is the body's largest consumer of oxygen. Although it is only three percent of the body's total weight, the brain consumes 25 percent of the body's oxygen intake.

 

Win Wenger, in How to Increase Your Intelligence, noted that "only those brain cells which are close to an ample capillary blood supply are thoroughly developed. Away from such source of supply, brain cells remain undeveloped and useless." Wenger describes "upside down activities" to increase oxygen supply to the brain. He states, "In short, you can much improve the physical state of your entire brain." A brain that is better nourished simply works better.

 

Some people claim that increasing the circulation of blood to the head through inversion may also improve the color and tone of your skin, stimulate mental alertness, and improve hearing and vision. In addition, some claim that hair will be healthier, and may even grow again, if the scalp is well supplied with blood.

 

Peter Russell notes in The Brain Book that the deterioration of the brain is not directly linked to age alone. Rather, this deterioration is caused by hardening arteries and high blood pressure, both of which decrease the supply of oxygen to the brain. Thus a major step in reducing mental deterioration (or senility) over time may simply be increasing the oxygen supply to the brain. Keeping the brain active and well supplied with oxygen may help maintain your brain function and mental sharpness throughout your entire life. NOTE: If you have high blood pressure, consult your physician before starting an inversion program.

 

Inversion relieves varicose veins by stimulating circulation, inversion has been known to relieve varicose veins. Varicose veins are caused when blood pools in the veins due to weakened one-way valves. The downward pull of gravity causes blood to slip back, and over time the vein will distend and become painful. When inverting, the pressure is relieved and the heart is able to clear the blood from the lower body.

Courtesy of: greendoorwellness.com

 

Types of Massage | Muscle Injury | Sports Massage & Personal Training | Home Care | Home

Lisa Christine Alexander, Registered Massage Therapist | Call or Text: 604-886-8880
















Inversion Traction Unit

Inverting is as easy as 1-2-3

Click here for details

 











 


In this section:

Pain: The Messenger

 

Back & Neck Anatomy

Causes of Back Pain


How to Treat

 

Heat/Ice Therapy

 

Inversion

 

Joint Dysfunction

 

Postural Education


Postural Alignment and Joint Dysfunction


What is joint dysfunction?

 

Joint dysfunction is characterized by pain, noise and reduced range of motion in any joint. Joint dysfunction may be caused by traumatic injury inc. impact injuries penetrating the fascia, muscle and structures lying deeper. Also simple partial tears strain and sprains create spasm leading to chronic tension and reduced range of motion.

 

 

Joint dysfunction can also be caused by overuse injuries.

Both types of injury result in:

 

• Swelling and spasm
• Muscle tension and trigger points
• Reduced Active and Passive Range of Motion

 

The chronic results include joint dysfunction because the muscles, responding to trauma with their incredible strength, pull the joint out of its intended biomechanical movement pattern. Joints all adhere to certain movement capabilities, now begin to rub and create irritation, bone spurs, calcification, noise etc.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Types of Massage | Muscle Injury | Sports Massage & Personal Training | Home Care | Home

Lisa Christine Alexander, Registered Massage Therapist | Call or Text: 604-886-8880

 
 











 


In this section:

Pain: The Messenger

 

Back & Neck Anatomy

Causes of Back Pain


How to Treat

 

Heat/Ice Therapy

 

Inversion

 

Joint Dysfunction

 

Postural Education


Postural education


One of the keys to preventing re-injury is postural education. Posture is a very important factor in avoiding a relapse of a spinal injury. During initial phases of physical therapy visits, patients receive instructions on proper posture.


Body Mechanics


This is another vital part of spine education. The average person does a great deal of bending, lifting, and possibly twisting on any given day. These movements are commonly associated with the onset of back pain, sciatic symptoms and facette joint symptoms. Therapists give instruction on proper ways to perform these activities, and also point out movements that should be avoided at all times. It is important to continue to follow proper body mechanics after the injury and throughout the rest of your life.

 

Stretching and Stabilization


There are a number of exercises for the spine. Most of them require no special equipment, and can be performed on the floor either with the therapist or at home. They include stretching and stabilization exercises, which produce low amounts of stress and strain at the point of injury, yet help greatly with proper alignment and stabilization of the spine.

 

Resistance Training


Once a patient is showing improvement of pain and adequate efficiency of the basic stretches and stabilization exercises, it is time to move on the more intense muscle building routines. These include use of weight machines specifically designed to focus on the back, abdominal, and oblique muscles. During this phase, it is extremely important that a patient uses the proper technique with the machines in order to avoid making the injury worse.


Postural Stabilization by Mike Castellano


Our bodies withstand numerous stresses from all different directions throughout the day. These stresses include gravity, twisting, bending, and the forces of everyday lifting. It does this largely by using its postural muscles or stabilizers to control the amount of force acting on our joints. Without this stabilization occurring naturally in our bodies our joints would not be able to withstand the years of pounding we put them through. These muscles are able to limit the amount of motion occurring at the joints to limit unnecessary wear and tear to the structures that make up each individual joint.

The key to core stabilization is being able to control these muscle groups as well as have them working on an involuntary basis. Being able to contract a specific muscle group to prepare for a certain task can limit the amount of strain placed on the joints and ligaments, thus reducing the risk of permanent injuries.


For example, the abdominals and the lower back extensors work together as postural stabilizers to limit the forward and backwards movement in the spine. These muscles need to work as a team to counteract the stresses on the joints in the lower back.


The Core Stabilizers

- If you suffer from back pain you should consult your doctor before trying any of these exercises! -

Abdominals- This group of muscles are the key to good posture and core control. They consist of two groups of muscles: the Midline group (rectus abdominus) upper/lower and the Oblique group(side muscles).Tightening these muscles will cause the upper body to bend forward and the pelvis to tilt backwards.

 

Back Extensors - Remember when your parents always told you to sit up straight and to stop slouching? Well, that was the beginning of your bodies core training. By sitting up straight you contract the spinal erectors and other lower back muscles thus pulling your upper back in line with your lower back.

 

Step 0: The Retraining


Now, these two groups of muscles first have to be taught how to work individually, by this I mean that you need to be able to contract these muscle groups and create movement by doing so.

 

1. Begin by standing with your hands on your hips in a comfortable position. Then place one hand on your abdomen and one on your lower back. Next, slowly squeeze the muscles of your abdomen tight until you begin to feel them contracting. As you do this you should be able to feel your pelvis tilting backwards to face the sky. This is known as a pelvic tilt.

 

2. The next step is to do the opposite. This time you want to contract the muscles of the lower back until you begin to feel them contracting. As you are doing this you should feel your pelvis tilting forward to face the ground. This is also increasing the curve in your lower back.
Neither of these exercises are meant to be real strength builders but I have come across a few people who couldn't perform these simple tasks.. If you notice you can move in one direction but not the other it may also be a result of lack of flexibility in the surrounding muscles and this needs to be addressed with stretching.


3. Now that these muscles can work individually it is time to learn how to stabilize your core muscle groups. Standing in the exact same position you were just in previously with your hands on both your abdominals and your lower back, contract both groups of muscles until no movement occurs around your pelvis. By this I mean, that if your pelvis tilts forwards or backwards then one group is winning the tug of war over the other thus causing an imbalance in pelvic movement. Repeat this exercise until you can hold these contracted muscles for thirty seconds or more without fail.


The goal here isn't to lock the pelvis in one position but to allow it to have controlled movement in a comfortable range of motion. For example: during a weighted squat the lower back is vulnerable to joint and disc injuries. By contracting their abdominals and their lower back muscles in just the right position they create a comfortable range of motion in which they can do their activity. The strongest power lifters in the world probably have the greatest control over their core stabilizers as they can lift 800-900 lbs without completely destroying their backs, while a mother of two children can blow a disc in her back simply by loading the car with groceries because she has very little core strength.


The next step is to be able to perform these contractions or hold these positions while performing certain daily tasks like sitting and standing for prolonged periods of time, and lifting and bending repeatedly.


Obviously, being in shape helps in the strength aspect of being able to hold these positions for any period of time. Surprisingly enough though many people have lost the ability to control these muscles whether it is due to a previous pregnancy or back problems from an accident. Thus, all the crunches in the world won't enable you to relearn these movements unless they are specifically practiced on a regular basis.

 

Courtesy of Mike Castellano
castellano@idirect.com

 

 

 

 


Types of Massage | Muscle Injury | Sports Massage & Personal Training | Home Care | Home

Lisa Christine Alexander, Registered Massage Therapist | Call or Text: 604-886-8880

 
 










 



In this section:

Pain: The Messenger

 

Back & Neck Anatomy

Causes of Back Pain


How to Treat

 

Heat/Ice Therapy

 

Inversion

 

Joint Dysfunction

 

Postural Education



LOWER BACK PAIN STUDY

 

A new study by a researcher at University of Toronto shows that massage therapy can cure 63 percent of patients with sub-acute low-back pain.*


In the study, 107 subjects with sub-acute low-back pain were randomly assigned to one of four groups: comprehensive massage therapy, soft tissue manipulation, remedial exercise and posture education and, finally, laser therapy.


After one month, 63% of subjects in the comprehensive massage therapy group reported no pain while only 27% of the soft-tissue manipulation group, 14% of the remedial exercise and none of the laser therapy group reported an absence of pain. Each received six treatments in a month. The study appeared in the June 27, 2000 edition of the Canadian Medical Association Journal.

 

The results are especially good news for BC's Registered Massage Therapists because it shows that comprehensive massage therapy provided by professionally-trained practitioners is much more effective than simple soft-tissue manipulation. "Not only does the study show that massage therapy is an extremely effective treatment for low back pain, but it also proves that you need to see a Registered Massage Therapist to get the results you want" says Mark Bentz, the President of the Massage Therapists' Association of British Columbia. While there are many people who claim to provide massage services such as body workers and masseuses, "RMT" is the public's assurance of professional and ethical treatment. BC is home to some of the most qualified massage therapists in the country, with the province requiring at least three years of education in massage therapy methods and general health issues.

 

For more information, or to get a copy of the study, call Kevin Moffitt at 1-888-255-4755.


*For the purposes of this study, sub-acute is defined as having back pain between one and eight months and an absence of a specific condition such as pregnancy, bone fracture, nerve damage or severe psychiatric condition.

 

 

 

 

 

Types of Massage | Muscle Injury | Sports Massage & Personal Training | Home Care | Home

Lisa Christine Alexander, Registered Massage Therapist | Call or Text: 604-886-8880

 

 

 
 











 


In this section:

Pain: The Messenger

 

Back & Neck Anatomy

Causes of Back Pain


How to Treat

 

Heat/Ice Therapy

 

Inversion

 

Joint Dysfunction

 

Postural Education



 

 

 

 

Types of Massage | Muscle Injury | Sports Massage & Personal Training | Home Care | Home

Lisa Christine Alexander, Registered Massage Therapist | Call or Text: 604-886-8880

 

 

 

 

 
 










 



In this section:

Pain: The Messenger

 

Back & Neck Anatomy

Causes of Back Pain


How to Treat

 

Heat/Ice Therapy

 

Inversion

 

Joint Dysfunction

 

Postural Education


INVERSION TRACTION UNIT


Inversion is as easy as 1-2-3...

 

 

1

 

Lean forward while holding the handle grips. To raise restraint bar, raise one foot.

Step into unit and ensure pelvic (hip) bones are a minimum of 3cm above the top of thigh support/seat.

 

2

 

Grasp the side grips and tip forward. Continue to M-Beam until fully inverted. Relax.

 

3

 

This is the correct position for natural traction to occur. Height adjustment may be required as you begin to stretch out. Be sure that your head is not touching the floor during inversion. Adjust height and femur dial if necessary to ensure that only your thigh is on thigh pad and that you are hanging straight. Thigh pad should be fairly level (as shown in picture).

 

 

 

 

Types of Massage | Muscle Injury | Sports Massage & Personal Training | Home Care | Home

Lisa Christine Alexander, Registered Massage Therapist | Call or Text: 604-886-8880